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30
Nov

Famous Adoptees – Infographic

To wrap up National Adoption Month, we want to leave you with an infographic that shows adoptees can be anything, do anything and go anywhere in life. We hope you’ve enjoyed our content throughout the month, and more importantly, that you’ve learned something about adoption. 

As they first think about creating an adoption plan, many expectant parents wonder if an adopted person can be as successful. But birth parents and adoptive parents alike know that adopted people go on to be just as successful as their peers. Just read the infographic below to learn about some famous adoptees!

famous-adoptions-infographic

23
Nov

Birth Mother Myths vs Realities – Infographics

As you know, November is National Adoption Month, and to honor this special holiday, we will be posting a new, helpful infographic every Wednesday this week. We hope these graphics will help you understand more about the adoption process and adoption in general.

It’s not uncommon for adoption newcomers to have preconceived notions about who a birth mom is, what her life is like and why she might be choosing adoptions.

But the truth is the brave and selfless women who choose to place their children for adoption come from a variety of ages, backgrounds and family types and also choose adoption for a variety of reasons.

Check out the infographic below for myths and realities about birth mothers. And then keep reading below to learn more about the sort of birth mothers who place their children with our agency.

MythvReality2.0 - smaller

16
Nov

Bad vs Good Adoption Language – Infographic

As you know, November is National Adoption Month, and to honor this special holiday, we will be posting a new, helpful infographic every Wednesday this month. We hope these graphics will help you understand more about the adoption process and adoption in general.

Many adoptive families struggle daily with those unfamiliar with adoption using insensitive adoption language. While it may seem innocent to an outsider, these negative adoption terms can have a lasting affect on adoptive families and especially adopted children.  

No matter how well-intentioned they may be, a stranger who approaches an adoptive family in the supermarket could potentially inflict pain on an adoptive parent or child with one simple statement or question. A simple phrase could cause a child to question the way he was brought into his family. One innocent word can cause a child to think she is strange or different or unwanted.

American Adoptions, along with others in the adoption community, promotes the use of positive adoption language that encourages a more accepting view of adoption. A few small changes in vocabulary can help promote adoption as a normal way to build a family.

Adoption Language Infographic

9
Nov

Adoption Process for Adoptive Families – Infographic

As you  know, November is National Adoption Month, and to honor this special holiday, we will be posting a new, helpful infographic every Wednesday this month. We hope these graphics will help you understand more about the adoption process and adoption in general.

Many families who are just beginning the adoption process become overwhelmed by the many steps and legal aspects of the adoption process. It can be difficult for families to even understand where to start. 

The infographic below takes you through the adoption process step by step. From moving past your infertility to finalizing the adoption we have broken everything down to help you understand exactly how adoption works.

AF-DK

2
Nov

Adoption in the U.S. – Infographic

As you know, November is National Adoption Month, and to honor this special holiday, we will be posting a new, helpful infographic every Wednesday this month. We hope these graphics will help you understand more about the adoption process and adoption in general.

As they consider adoption, many pregnant women wonder what life will be like for their adopted child.

A pregnant woman gets to choose the path for their own adoption journey and can select exactly the sort of family she’s looking for.

But we do also have statistics and information that tell us what the lives of adopted children are often like. See in the infographic below for more information:

Adoption in the US infographic - smaller

26
Jan

Adoption Tax Credit 2015 [Infographic]

Adoption Tax Credit 2015 - small teaserNow that 2015 has come to a close – and we’re finally getting used to writing 2016 on our dates – many families will begin to prepare their finances for tax season. As you do so, don’t forget to look into the Federal Adoption Tax Credit.

For 2015, the maximum adoption tax credit is $13,400 for all qualifying adoption expenses. The adoption tax credit is not refundable, which means that only those individuals with tax liability (taxes owed) will benefit. The credit will remain flat for special needs adoptions (those involving children who are deemed hard to place by a child welfare agency), allowing those families to claim the maximum credit regardless of expenses.

The adoption tax credit income limit is based on modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) and is recalculated each year. In January 2013, the Federal Adoption Tax Credit was made permanent, although the credit could change or be eliminated in the event  of future tax code reform. See the infographic at the bottom of this post for more information on how the tax credit can help your family.

If your family also lives in a state that offers an adoption tax credit (amounts vary by state), you may receive credit for additional expenses as well.

Read more about the Adoption Tax Credit, qualifying expenses and how employer reimbursements could affect your tax credit status on our website. And follow the American Adoptions’ blog for any new updates on the adoption tax credit.

Haven’t Yet Finalized Your Adoption Placement?

Learn How to Seek the Adoption Tax Credit Before Finalization

Every year, adoptive families ask if they can file taxes without their child’s social security number, which is typically received after the adoption is finalized.

Your adoption attorney should apply for a SSN along with the final amended birth certificate after the finalization court hearing. If you do not have these items yet, you our your accountant and/or tax representative can apply for a temporary tax identification number for the baby. You can file your taxes with that number.  Here is a link to Form W-7A for information aboutobtaining a temporary tax ID number. You can also search the IRS website for Adoption Taxpayer Identification Number information.

For more information on the adoption tax credit and exclusion, visit www.irs.gov. American Adoptions recommends that you contact a local accountant or qualified tax professional for more specific information for your family. 

Adoption Tax Credit 2015 - smaller

The Federal Adoption Tax Credit needs your help!

Currently the Federal Adoption Tax Credit is nonrefundable, so it can only help certain families. Because of this, the Save the Adoption Tax Credit Working Group is currently working with members of Congress in an effort to preserve the tax credit and make it a refundable credit. As a refundable credit, every adoptive family within the MAGI range would benefit, making adoption a more affordable option for our families. Learn more about how you can help advocate for a refundable credit.

20
Nov

Bad v Good Adoption Language [Infographic]

As you may know, this Saturday is National Adoption Day, and to honor this special holiday, we will be posting a new, helpful infographic every day this week. We hope these graphics will help you understand more about the adoption process and adoption in general.

Many adoptive families struggle daily with those unfamiliar with adoption using insensitive adoption language. While it may seem innocent to an outsider, these negative adoption terms can have a lasting affect on adoptive families and especially adopted children.  

No matter how well-intentioned they may be, a stranger who approaches an adoptive family in the supermarket could potentially inflict pain on an adoptive parent or child with one simple statement or question. A simple phrase could cause a child to question the way he was brought into his family. One innocent word can cause a child to think she is strange or different or unwanted.

American Adoptions, along with others in the adoption community, promotes the use of positive adoption language that encourages a more accepting view of adoption. A few small changes in vocabulary can help promote adoption as a normal way to build a family.

Adoption Language Infographic

19
Nov

Open v Closed v Semi-Open Adoption [Infographic]

As you may know, this Saturday is National Adoption Day, and to honor this special holiday, we will be posting a new, helpful infographic every day this week. We hope these graphics will help you understand more about the adoption process and adoption in general.

“Open adoption” is a well-known and often-used term when talking about adoption, but what does open adoption really mean?

Because a birth mother has the freedom to choose so many aspects of an adoption, no two adoptions are ever quite the same. This is why it is so difficult to label whether an adoption is an “open adoption” or not. Would we call an adoption where the birth mother only receives pictures and letters an “open adoption?” If so, what do we call an adoption where the birth mother has a personal relationship with her child well into the future?

Thus, there are certainly many different types of open adoption, which is why it’s sometimes better to look at open adoption on a scale of 1-10 with 1 being fully closed and 10 being fully open. Most adoptions fall somewhere in the middle, with minimal contact shared between both parties, and picture and letter updates sent to the birth mother throughout the adoptee’s childhood. Some agencies refer to these adoption relationships as “semi-open adoptions,” with the exchange of non-identifying information and limited contact.

The infographic below further outlines this scale:

Open Adoption - Branded - Smaller

More than 9 out of every 10 women we work with would prefer some future contact with their child, so American Adoptions requires that its adoptive families be open to at least a semi-open adoption. To learn more about contact in adoptions, visit the following articles on our site.

For Adoptive Families:

For Birth Parents:

18
Nov

Adoption Process for Adoptive Families [Infographic]

As you may know, this Saturday is National Adoption Day, and to honor this special holiday, we will be posting a new, helpful infographic every day this week. We hope these graphics will help you understand more about the adoption process and adoption in general.

Many families who are just beginning the adoption process become overwhelmed by the many steps and legal aspects of the adoption process. It can be difficult for families to even understand where to start. 

The infographic below takes you through the adoption process step by step. From moving past your infertility to finalizing the adoption we have broken everything down to help you understand exactly how adoption works.

AF-DK

17
Nov

Birth Mother Myths v Realities [Infographic]

As you may know, this Saturday is National Adoption Day, and to honor this special holiday, we will be posting a new, helpful infographic every day this week. We hope these graphics will help you understand more about the adoption process and adoption in general.

It’s not uncommon for adoption newcomers to have preconceived notions about who a birth mom is, what her life is like and why she might be choosing adoptions.

But the truth is the brave and selfless women who choose to place their children for adoption come from a variety of ages, backgrounds and family types and also choose adoption for a variety of reasons.

Check out the infographic below for myths and realities about birth mothers. And then keep reading below to learn more about the sort of birth mothers who place their children with our agency.

MythvReality2.0 - smaller

The following statistics and information were collected from the women American Adoptions helped complete adoptions from October 2012 to October 2014. As you can see, only about one in five women could be categorized as “teen moms.” About four of five women have completed their high school education and/or pursued further education; four out of five women have other children before they choose adoption. Additionally, almost 10 percent of women who choose adoption are married.

Age

  • 21% were under 20
  • 57% were between 20 and 30 years old
  • 15% were between 30 and 40 years old

Education

Of the women who answered…

  • 22% have not graduated high school
  • 38% graduated high school and have no other secondary education
  • 69% graduated high school and have some college credit
  • 44% graduated high school and have completed college

Other Children

  • 40% did not have any other children
  • 21% had one other child
  • 20% had two other children
  • 11 % had three other children
  • 8% had four or more children

Marriage

  • 7% were married
  • 93% were not married

To learn more about choosing adoption with American Adoptions, visit our website or call
1-800-ADOPTION.

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